The illusion of being right and the paradox of being right and making the right thing happen

The Illusion of Being Right and The Paradox of Being Right and Making The Right Things Happen

Sometimes there is no credit for being right.
In many cases, there is a big difference between being right and making the right things happen.

If you see a disaster and you are right about this disaster going to happen, there are few decisions you can take:
1. If you want to be right, if you want the credit (sometimes without even notice) you will be right if you will show that it happened “hey here I told here is the disaster as I told you, it happened, I am right “ – so you were right and here is your credit, but what is the point of this credit?
2. If you want to make the right thing happen, you must to put yourself aside, eliminate the human weakness of wanting to be right, look at the big picture, with you small inside it (not too small, but as little as you really are) be aware of the thinking error in being right and making right things happen. If you do all this, you must know that by making the right things happen you prevent from a disaster to happen, and by doing this you lose the only proof of you being right. And sometimes even you can not be sure that you were right, but if you are focused on the right things to happen, who cares? If the new ways are better(maybe not perfect, or not perfect yet), then screw the old path and the credit.

Now here are the values meeting the power of perspective thinking… choose, do you want to be right and take the credit or do you want to do the right thing happen, maybe in the price of losing all your credit?

Between man and his fellow, for example; If you recognize somebody doing something wrong, you think that he is getting crazy, by proving that you make him crazy, by striving to show that you are wrong you can save him from being crazy and smile while tasting the fruits of the unthankful dirty business of making right things happen… So you have no credit, but maybe you have an uncrazy friend? If you choose the global perspective again, you got yourself a much better situation.

In education, where we deal with the prediction and creation of the future, this paradox should be termed as the “The Paradox of the Coach” or “The Paradox of the educator”. Let us talk about mathematics skill. Think for example about a teacher and his student. As a teacher, you teach skills and then test the skills of your students, you classify them, and as a side effect, you prove them being good or bad in math (on the scale of 100 points). Now Suppose you have a student classified as good as 70 points in math. Now you know that this student is not so good at math, and probably you are right (at the moment). Now you can choose, do you want to prove bad math skills of your student? Or do you want to prove that maybe you are wrong?

It is your choice to end the process with a grade and classification or maybe take some action looking at his future? loosing your “being right credit” just to prove that you are wrong, maybe…

Yom Kippur, by the Jewish tradition, it is a day of introspection, an opportunity to be wrong. I wish you a meaningful Yom Kippur, and I wish you being mostly wrong, and take the credit for being right just if there is no other choice!

We have a habit of asking forgiveness in Yom Kippur, if you did the right things along the way, and you were stronger then just being right with credit, you will not get any calls this day of people being sorry… but smile, you probably were right and Proved to be wrong because you did the right things. And when should you ask forgiveness? The paradox of makings right things will point to ask forgiveness from those that you actually helped them…crazy shit it is, but that is all the point of being a good person — no credit but within a much better environment.

please, share your thoughts and examples on that matter and have a meaningful Yom Kippur!

One thought on “The Illusion of Being Right and The Paradox of Being Right and Making The Right Things Happen

  1. Daniel Muller Post author

    Think about mathematics skill, for example, think about a teacher and his student. As a teacher, you teach skills and then test the skills of your students, you classify them, and as a side effect, you prove them being good or bad in math (on the scale of 100 points). Now Suppose you have a student classified as good as 70 points in math. Now you know that this student is not so good at math, and probably you are right (for now). Now you can choose, do you want to prove to him that? Or do you want to prove you are wrong?

    It is your choice to end the process with a grade and classification or maybe take some action looking at his future with no credit to prove you are wrong, maybe…

    Reply

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